Moosehead Area Fishing Report – Piscataquis Observer

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By Tim Obrey, Moosehead Lake Area Regional Fisheries Supervisor July and August are not considered good months for trout and salmon fishing, but here are some tips/tricks that might help. The fish are still there, just lower and less active.

By Tim Obrey, Moosehead Lake Area Regional Fisheries Supervisor

July and August are not considered good months for trout and salmon fishing, but here are some tips/tricks that might help. The fish are still there, just lower and less active. You will have to bring yourself to their level.

Salmon and brook trout like to hang out at the top of the thermocline, that area of ​​deeper lakes where the water stays cold. For larger lakes like Moosehead, Chesuncook, Sebec, and Chamberlain lakes, this usually means you need to fish between 35 and 50 feet in the summer. Lake trout also like this range, but can often be found deeper. However, the deepest water, say beyond 90 feet, is where small lake trout usually hang out.

You don’t need to go that far. Smaller ponds with deep water (more than 25 feet) also stratify in the summer, but most of these ponds are starved of oxygen in the deeper areas and fish cannot survive there. Don’t waste your time fishing the deep hole. For smaller trout ponds, try to fish between 12 and 15 feet. A thermometer with a cable is the best way to locate the thermocline. Lower it into the water column and watch the temperature drop. This is the depth to start fishing.

July and August are perfect for a family fishing/canoeing trip. The pesky insects have receded and the weather is perfect for outdoor activities. Of course, the Allagash River is the epitome of canoe travel in Maine. The friendly folks at the Allagash Wilderness Waterway do a great job managing the waterway’s river and lakes. The campsites are immaculate and there always seems to be a good flow in the river.

We see many travelers heading to Lake Chamberlain at the start of their journey. The Penobscot River between Lobster and Chesuncook lakes is another good option if you’re looking for a less challenging paddle. The Bureau of Public Lands manages this area and there are lots of nice campsites on the river and lakes. Trout fishing may not be at its peak, but perch and chub will keep the kids busy until it’s time to cook the smores.

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